Australian Embassy
Rome
Italy, San Marino, Albania, Libya

Marriage in Italy

 MARRIAGE IN ITALY

Australian government representatives cannot perform marriage ceremonies and it is not possible to get married at an Australian Embassy or Consulate.


Two main documents are required for Australian citizens to marry in Italy. These are the Atto Notorio and the Nulla Osta. Outlined below is information regarding this documentation. Please contact the marriage office of the city were you intend to marry in order to obtain more detailed information on marriage requirements (including the list of documents that you need to present) for Australian citizens wishing to marry in Italy.


1. "Atto di notorietà per uso matrimonio" (also known as Atto Notorio): this should be obtained from the Italian Embassy or nearest Italian Consulate in the state where you reside before leaving Australia.  If you are unable to obtain the Atto Notorio from an Italian Consulate in Australia, you may obtain one from a Tribunale Civile (Civil Court) in Italy. The marriage office of the city where you plan to get married may also be able to assist with the Atto Notorio (or equivalent document).

Below are the contact details and opening hours of the Tribunale Civile in Rome, although an Atto Notorio may be obtained from any Tribunale Civile in Italy. You should contact .


Tribunale Civile di Roma
Office for "Atti Notori"
Viale Giulio Cesare 54/B
1st floor, Room 86 - Tel: +39 063577 296
Business Hours: Morning: Monday to Friday : 9:00 to 12.30

Please note that you must call beforehand to set an appointment.

If you are requesting the Atto Notorio from the Tribunale Civile, you must attend in person together with two adult witnesses. If either spouse or one of the witnesses does not speak Italian, it is necessary to provide an interpreter, in addition to the two witnesses.

N.B. Neither spouse can act as witness or interpreter.
Payment at the Tribunale Civile is made in the form of revenue stamps which you should purchase in advance. The amount required is:

For an urgent certificate issued on the same day:
• One duty stamp for the value of 16,00 Euros for the original Atto Notorio which will be kept by the Tribunale Civile
plus
• another 16,00 Euro duty stamp for your copy of the Atto Notorio and 3 duty stamps for the value of 6.20 euros each.

OR

If the certificate is not urgent (to be collected after 5 days):
• One duty stamp for the value of 16,00 Euros for the original Atto Notorio which will be kept by the Tribunale Civile
plus
• another 16,00 Euro duty stamp and 1 duty stamp for the value of 6.20 euro.


2. NULLA OSTA: In addition to the above-mentioned Atto Notorio, an Australian citizen intending to marry in Italy will need to make a Sworn Declaration (Nulla Osta) at the Australian Embassy in Rome or the Australian Consulate-General in Milan. Make sure you travel with your Australian passport as this has to be presented to Embassy/Consulate officers when signing the Nulla Osta.
A Nulla Osta states that there is no impediment to marriage and must be signed, whether you are single, divorced or widowed, in the presence of an Australian Consular officer at the Australian Embassy in Rome (Via Antonio Bosio 5, Tel: +39 06/85272246) or Australian Consulate-General in Milan (via Borgogna 2 Tel: +39 02/77674217). Please contact the Consular Section of the Embassy/Consulate before attending as an appointment is required in order to obtain the Nulla Osta.

Nulla Ostas sworn outside of Italy and Certificates of No Impediment are not valid for use in Italy.
If you have been married previously, please provide evidence of the termination of your marriage. The consular officer who witnesses your signature for the Nulla Osta will need to see, where applicable, your original divorce certificate. Photocopies are not acceptable. Please note that a divorced woman who wishes to marry again within 300 days of the date of her divorce must contact the local Italian authorities and seek special permission from an Italian magistrate to remarry. Otherwise, a divorcee must allow the required period of 300 days to elapse. If you are widowed, you must bring the death certificate of your late spouse with you in order to satisfy the requirements surrounding the issue of a Nulla Osta. Certificates can be obtained from the Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages.

The Nulla Osta (Sworn Declaration) is valid for six months and costs the Euro equivalent of A$50.00 per Australian citizen. Payments may only be made in cash as credit card services are not available at the Australian Embassy/Consulate.

All certificates, including divorce certificates or death certificates certifying termination of your previous marriage, MUST be ORIGINALS. Photocopies are not accepted.

Legalisation: Once you have obtained the Nulla Osta, it will have to be legalised by the Uffico Legalizzazioni of the Prefettura. The details of the Prefettura in Rome are: Viale Ostiense, 131L, 2nd floor, Scala B, Rome - open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 9:00am-11.30am. Before going to the Prefettura, you will need to purchase a revenue stamp (marca da bollo) which costs Euro 16,00 at a tobacconist (tabaccaio) to take with you.

The 'Ufficio Legalizzazioni' at the Prefettura in Milan is located at Corso Monforte no. 31. Please call the Prefettura in Milan before attending for a legalisation as you need to set an appointment for this service. 
 Please contact the marriage office of the city were you intend to marry in order to obtain more detailed information on marriage requirements (including the list of documents that you need to present) for Australian citizens wishing to marry in Italy.

• CIVIL CEREMONY
As a first step, take the Atto Notorio and Nulla Osta to the Ufficio Matrimoni, or Marriage Office, in the Italian city where you plan to marry. 

If you are getting married in Rome, the contact details for the Marriage Office in Rome are: Via Petroselli, 50, Rome (tel: 06-6710-3066). The office is open from Monday to Friday, 8:30am - 4:00 pm. If you do not speak Italian please seek the assistance of someone who speaks Italian and can provide a simple translation. At this time, you will be given an appointment to lodge your Declaration of Intent to Marry, and another for the actual marriage ceremony. These appointments may fall on the same day. It is customary to pay a fee for the rental of the marriage hall, and this may vary according to where you are getting married.

The Declaration of Intent to Marry is followed by the Civil Ceremony. You may apply for a marriage certificate (certificato di matrimonio) shortly before the wedding ceremony and you should receive it immediately after the ceremony. Ask to have an Apostille affixed to the Italian Marriage certificate by the Italian authorities at the Prefettura of the city where you get married, so that it may legally valid once you return to Australia. Please keep in mind that during the peak marriage season (May to September), it could be difficult to get an appointment for the marriage celebrant and to apply for the Apostille.

If one of the parties marrying is Italian or is an Australian with Italian residency, the Italian authorities may require that Banns (pubblicazione di matrimonio) be posted for at least two weeks before the date of the marriage. Please contact the marriage office of the city where you intend to marry in order to obtain more detailed information regarding this requirement.

For further information regarding the Atto Notorio, please contact the Italian Embassy or Consulate in the state in which you reside.

 Australian Embassy - Rome
Consular Section
Email: consular-rome@dfat.gov.au
Fax: +39 0685272300
Ph. +39 0685272246

Please note that the cost of the Italian revenue stamp (marca da bollo) required for the legalisation of the Nulla Osta and, where applicable, for the issue of the Atto  Notorio by the Italian Civil Courts, may change without notice.

The above information is provided by the Consular Section of the Australian Embassy in Rome for the convenience of enquirers, but neither the Australian Government nor the Embassy can take any responsibility whatsoever in regard to the consequences of using the above information.